Rat Riddance

 Lithograph of “gnawing animals or rodents” [1874]. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division. LC-DIG-pga-12053.

Lithograph of “gnawing animals or rodents” [1874]. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division. LC-DIG-pga-12053.

Take advantage of seasonal change. Make sure that rodents are controlled during winter, and there will be fewer around to breed in the spring. This can help prevent a year of problems.

Store garbage in metal or heavy-duty plastic containers with tight-fitting lids. Keep kitchens clean and food stored in secure containers.

Keep yards clean so that rats and mice don't have the shelter and food necessary for breeding, and so that any young rodents seeking a new home won't easily move in. This includes cleaning up weeds, trash piles, garbage, and pet food.

Inspect buildings carefully, especially in the early fall. Make sure there are no holes or cracks for rats and mice to gain entrance. You can make rodent control work by reducing the food, water, and shelter that rodents need to thrive--and that's an important tip for every season of the year!

Contact the DC Department of Health at (877) 672-2174 for rat abatement. For additional information, visit DOH’s rodent control web page and the Good to Know page on this website.